Svartþröstum kyngir niður

[English summary below]

From 10.-11. March 2021, a depression came from the southeast into the Northeast. It captured a considerable number of birds that have probably been flying over the North Sea, on their way to nesting sites in Scandinavia. The first indications that the depression was carrying birds to the Northeast were seen in the afternoon of March 10, during the worst weather. Three black thrushes were spotted in the garden by Víkingavatn in Kelduhverfi, but black thrushes had not been seen there all winter. The next morning the number had risen to eleven and increased to at least twenty as the day progressed.It had then become clear that a considerable number of stray birds were expected around the country in the northeast, but it is considered very unusual to get stray birds to Iceland so early in the spring.

A number of bird enthusiasts were on the move in the following days, in addition to reports of blackbirds and other migratory birds. The number of birds reported by location was kept track of. The total number of blackbirds was obtained by using the largest number reported from each location. No attempt was made to assess whether the birds were the same between nearby places, as the numbers were so large and widespread that it was inappropriate to try to estimate the movements of birds. However, the number of blackbirds that are believed to have been wintering in some places was taken into account.

In the week following the arrival of the depression on March 10, more than 1,800 blackbirds were reported (Figures 1 and 2). Most of them came ashore from Skagafjörður east of Hérað, but also a few were seen in the Eastfjords east of Höfn, in addition to which a single bird was reported in Miðfjörður. The core of the migration seems to have taken place in Þingeyjarsýsla, as well as Grímsey, but about and over 100 birds were seen in Grímsey, Húsavík, Kópasker and Þórshöfn. Various other stray birds were also seen, but nowhere near as large as the blackbirds. The rarest were three field splashes; in Húsavík on March 11 (Figure 3), Ketilsstaðir in Jökulsárhlíð on March 12 and at Hól in Melrakkaslétta on 13-14. March.Field splashes are rather rare strays in this country, but only 21 such had been found before. However, this may be one of the few stray species found almost exclusively in late winter or early spring, which is exactly the time they spend between wintering and nesting sites in Europe. Of the 24 birds that have been found here now, 22 of them were seen between 26 February and 2 April, but only two have been seen in the autumn. They were more frequent in previous years, but fifteen were found in the years 1960-1977. Other stray birds that were found in the North and East of Iceland on 11-15.In March, there were eighteen woodpeckers, eleven vipers, five songbirds (Fig. 4), five songbirds, two mistletoe thrushes (Fig. 5), ring doves, partridges, dwarf snipes, earwigs and gray sparrows (Fig. 6). April but only two have been seen in the autumn. They were more frequent in previous years, but fifteen were found in the years 1960-1977. Other stray birds that were found in the North and East of Iceland on 11-15. In March, there were eighteen woodpeckers, eleven vipers, five songbirds (Fig. 4), five songbirds, two mistletoe thrushes (Fig. 5), ring doves, partridges, dwarf snipes, earwigs and gray sparrows (Fig. 6). April but only two have been seen in the autumn. They were more frequent in previous years, but fifteen were found in the years 1960-1977.Other stray birds that were found in the North and East of Iceland on 11-15. In March, there were eighteen woodpeckers, eleven vipers, five songbirds (Fig. 4), five songbirds, two mistletoe thrushes (Fig. 5), ring doves, partridges, dwarf snipes, earwigs and gray sparrows (Fig. 6).

It is uncertain what will happen to all these blackbirds that came here. Many have probably given up on the cold and snow that followed the recession. It is not unlikely that some of the birds will try to return to their home habitats once they have rebuilt their fat reserves. But it can be assumed that some of the birds will decide to extend here until spring and possibly nest among the existing blackbirds.

Figure 1 . Number and distribution of blackthroats reported in the northeastern part of the country from 10.-18. March 2021. – Figure 1 . The number and distribution of Eurasian Blackbirds ( Turdus merula ) reported in northeastern Iceland from 10-18 March 2021.
Figure 2 . An adult blackbird man in Húsavík, March 14, 2021. – Figure 2 . Adult male Common Blackbird in Húsavík, 14 March 2021.  Ljósm / Photo Yann Kolbeinsson.
3. mynd. Hagaskvettukarl með þangflugu við Naustafjöru á Húsavík, 11. mars 2021. – Figure 3. Male European Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola) at Húsavík, 11 March 2021. Ljósm/Photo Yann Kolbeinsson.
4. mynd. Sönglævirki í Naustafjöru á Húsavík 15. mars 2021. – Figure 4. Eurasian Skylark (Alauda arvensis) in Húsavík, 15 March 2021. Ljósm/Photo Yann Kolbeinsson.
5. mynd. Mistilþröstur við Yltjörn sunnan Húsavíkur 12. mars 2021. – Figure 5. Mistle Thrush (Turdus viscivorus) near Húsavík, 12 March 2021. Ljósm/Photo Yann Kolbeinsson.
Figure 6 . Gray Sparrowhawk with snow buntings in Bakkafjörður 13 March 2021. – Figure 6 . Male House Sparrow ( Passer domesticus ) with Snow Buntings ( Plectrophenax nivalis ) at Bakkafjörður, 13 March 2021. Ljósm / Photo Yann Kolbeinsson.

ENGLISH SUMMARY:

An unprecedented influx of Common Blackbirds, totaling just over 1,800 birds, occurred in northeastern Iceland from 10 March 2021 onwards (figure 1-2). Stormy weather that hit northeast Iceland on 10-11 March 2021 appears to have translocated the birds while they were migrating across the North Sea towards Scandinavia. A number of other rare birds were also found during this time, three European Stonechats (figure 3) being the rarest of them all with only 21 recorded in Iceland prior to 2021. Other rarities include 18 Eurasian Woodcocks, eleven Northern Lapwings, five Eurasian Skylarks (figure 4), five Song Thrushes, 2 Mistle Thrushes (figure 5) and one each of Common Wood Pigeon, Eurasian Moorhen, Jack Snipe, Long-eared Owl and House Sparrow (figure 6).

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